Direct Hit


Milwaukee, WI

Over the past few years, a band called Direct Hit! and their mantra – “Fuck You! Get Pumped!” – have come to define party punk among a certain bearded and/or perpetually half-drunk constituency around the world. The Milwaukee-based group led by singer/guitarist Nick Woods began its young existence with the release of an increasingly-advanced series of free EPs on the internet, split records, and the acclaimed compilation LP Domesplitter in the process. But the band had bigger things on its mind for its first full-length album of all-new material, Brainless God, released on August 10, 2013 through Chicago’s Red Scare Industries.

“It’s a concept album about the end of the world,” Woods explains. “But at it’s core, it’s a love story about a girl and a serial killer, and the things they experience during the last few hours of life on earth. I’ve told people it sounds sort of like Meatloaf meets Black Flag, as told by Stephen King, but a lot dumber. It’s based on some time I spent thinking about death over that year, and how the ultimate party should come just before you pass on. This record sort of examines what that means from a lot of different angles. Don’t worry, there’s still zombies, mass murder, alcohol, and sorcery involved.”

Produced by Mike Kennerty (All-American Rejects) and mixed by Jon Drew (Fucked Up,
Tokyo Police Club), Brainless God’s music came accompanied by a 12-installment video series featured on YouTube and an album-length movie detailing its plot. This summer, Direct Hit! will release the LP on 12″ vinyl as part of a limited edition box set. This exclusive package will feature a special “soundtrack version” of the record, the video on DVD, a 48-page hand-assembled and  illustrated comic book, and a silkscreened and numbered cover with alternate artwork, designed by Wall Of Youth’s Eric Baskauskas.

Woods sees it as a logical follow-up to the box set the band released to raise a recording budget prior to Domesplitter.

“We have as much fun figuring out weird ways to release our music as we do writing it,” he says.

“Despite how advanced these songs sound compared to our older ones, we still act like idiots when it comes to letting people hear them.”